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Updated: Questions and Answers: Commuter Rail in New Hampshire

UPDATED: Commuter Rail in New Hampshire

This week, the Capitol Corridor Rail and Transit Study’s final report was released. The study, which began in 2013, examined ...

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February is that exciting time of the year when the governor gives us a special valentine in the form of her budget address.

The Governor’s Budget Address Starts Everything

February is that exciting time of the year when the governor gives us a special valentine in the form of ...

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Meet the Medicaid Enhancement Tax (MET)

Meet the MET

New Hampshire adopted the Medicaid Enhancement Tax as a means to leverage federal matching funds without imposing any real tax ...

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Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

The survey found that 97 percent of parents of scholarship recipients are satisfied with their chosen private or home schools, ...

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Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Choosing to Learn: Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Access to educational opportunities in New Hampshire is primarily determined by zip code and accident of birth. Though New Hampshire ...

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Recent Articles

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Minimum Wage Hike Will Hurt Entry Level Workers Most

    Proposals at the state and national level to increase the minimum wage will hurt the job market, decrease the number of jobs available, and hurt the people advocates are trying to help. Specifically, the higher wage will make it more expensive to hire entry level workers and reduce opportunities for lower skill workers trying to build job experience.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Are We Doomed to Be a Stagnant State?

    New Hampshire is complacent. As a state we seem to have accepted stagnation as a way of life and are just trying to figure out how to adapt to it. The vision of New Hampshire as an island of prosperity is receding as policymakers increasingly decide they must adopt rather than fight economic mediocrity.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Delayed Decisions are Difficult Decisions

    The decisions a politician makes this year will have an impact next year, particularly as it relates to the budget. Nonetheless, most politicians ignore short term consequences and pretend the future doesn’t exist. The logical outcomes of choices they make are often ignored and many decisions are delayed for a year or two as a way to avoid them.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Hassan’s timid, meaningless budget

    Charlie Arlinghaus February 18, 2014 As originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader Timid politics makes for bad budgeting. A case in point is Gov. Maggie Hassan’s proposed budget, which isn’t even a good first draft for the Legislature. It is a hodgepodge of mediocre ideas with a little money sprinkled here and there to get […]

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    The Business Profits Tax Affects Everyone

    Charlie Arlinghaus February 11, 2014 As originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader The vast majority of businesses in New Hampshire are non-employers. Interestingly, just 10 percent of firms account for 95 percent of the jobs. As states across the country and the region look to increase competitiveness by lowering business profits taxes, these numbers […]

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    The Governor’s Budget Address Starts Everything

    February is that exciting time of the year when the governor gives us a special valentine in the form of her budget address. Much better than candy or flowers, it is an outline of the two-year state budget – the policy document that guides every little thing the government does and defines an administration.

  • Josh | Questions and Answers

    UPDATED: Commuter Rail in New Hampshire

    This week, the Capitol Corridor Rail and Transit Study’s final report was released. The study, which began in 2013, examined a number of transit options for the corridor, with most of the public and political attention focused on the possibility of extending commuter rail into the state.

  • Press

    JBC Press Release: Train Study Optimistic and Overstated

    Assumptions significantly overstate revenue Josh Elliott-Traficante, Josiah Bartlett Center policy analyst covering transportation policy, commented on the Capital Corridor study released today. Elliott-Traficante described the study’s revenue estimates as rosy and out of line with the experience of every other commuter rail system in the country:“The study paints a rosy picture but its revenue assumptions are significantly […]