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Updated: Questions and Answers: Commuter Rail in New Hampshire

UPDATED: Commuter Rail in New Hampshire

This week, the Capitol Corridor Rail and Transit Study’s final report was released. The study, which began in 2013, examined ...

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February is that exciting time of the year when the governor gives us a special valentine in the form of her budget address.

The Governor’s Budget Address Starts Everything

February is that exciting time of the year when the governor gives us a special valentine in the form of ...

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Meet the Medicaid Enhancement Tax (MET)

Meet the MET

New Hampshire adopted the Medicaid Enhancement Tax as a means to leverage federal matching funds without imposing any real tax ...

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Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

The survey found that 97 percent of parents of scholarship recipients are satisfied with their chosen private or home schools, ...

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Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Choosing to Learn: Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Access to educational opportunities in New Hampshire is primarily determined by zip code and accident of birth. Though New Hampshire ...

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Recent Articles

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Minimum Wage Hike Will Hurt Entry Level Workers Most

    Proposals at the state and national level to increase the minimum wage will hurt the job market, decrease the number of jobs available, and hurt the people advocates are trying to help. Specifically, the higher wage will make it more expensive to hire entry level workers and reduce opportunities for lower skill workers trying to build job experience.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Are We Doomed to Be a Stagnant State?

    New Hampshire is complacent. As a state we seem to have accepted stagnation as a way of life and are just trying to figure out how to adapt to it. The vision of New Hampshire as an island of prosperity is receding as policymakers increasingly decide they must adopt rather than fight economic mediocrity.

  • Budget | Charts

    Highway Fund Revenue

    Looking at Highway Fund Revenues: A 28 Year Look

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Stagnation Will be Permanent Unless We think Long Term

    All too often for politicians the big picture can get lost by paying too much attention to details. The state’s budget season is a poster child for not being able to see the forest for the trees. The difficulty for politicians is that we expect them to simultaneously focus on the big picture and to pay strict attention to the details that threaten to obscure the big picture.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Legislative Apathy is Biggest Threat to Charter Schools

    Over the last twelve years charter schools have become a small but critically important part of New Hampshire’s education infrastructure. Today, they are under threat by a legislative apathy that threatens to starve them to death. Some opponents are content to ignore any problems hoping no one will notice as the schools fight a struggle for survival.

  • Budget | Josh

    Taking a Look at the Governor’s Budget Trailer Bill

    The State budget consists of two bills, traditionally numbered House Bill 1 (HB1) and House Bill 2 (HB2). HB1 is essentially a spreadsheet laying out spending levels, while HB2 contains all of the legal language to make it work on the spending side, as well as any changes needed to the tax code on the revenue side. Most of the 117 items contained in the Governor’s bill are technical details, but inevitably some new policy makes it in as well. Below are some of the major changes, and all of the tax and fee increases included.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Price Controls are Still Bad

    Those who would have the state government set and control prices in the workers’ compensation part of health care should remind themselves that they were opposed to government price controls five years ago when it was then-Sen. Maggie Hassan’s idea for a hospital price fixing commission. They were right then. They should listen to their old selves now.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Delayed Decisions are Difficult Decisions

    The decisions a politician makes this year will have an impact next year, particularly as it relates to the budget. Nonetheless, most politicians ignore short term consequences and pretend the future doesn’t exist. The logical outcomes of choices they make are often ignored and many decisions are delayed for a year or two as a way to avoid them.