Welcome to the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy

Featured Posts
Ignore the Rhetoric and Give Government a Time Out

Ignore the Rhetoric and Give Government a Time Out

The juvenile rhetoric that dominates so much of politics today makes it hard to sort out the looming budget veto ...

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Off Budget:
What Happens if New Hampshire Doesn’t Have a Budget by June 30?

Off Budget: What Happens if New Hampshire Doesn’t Have a Budget by June 30?

What happens if there is no state budget by June 30? With the Legislature and Governor at such odds on ...

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Does Commuter Rail Create Jobs?

Does Commuter Rail Create Jobs?

While studies of proposed passenger commuter rail lines often predict job creation, studies of lines that have been built and ...

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Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

The survey found that 97 percent of parents of scholarship recipients are satisfied with their chosen private or home schools, ...

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Recent Articles

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Minimum Wage Hike Will Hurt Entry Level Workers Most

    Proposals at the state and national level to increase the minimum wage will hurt the job market, decrease the number of jobs available, and hurt the people advocates are trying to help. Specifically, the higher wage will make it more expensive to hire entry level workers and reduce opportunities for lower skill workers trying to build job experience.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Are We Doomed to Be a Stagnant State?

    New Hampshire is complacent. As a state we seem to have accepted stagnation as a way of life and are just trying to figure out how to adapt to it. The vision of New Hampshire as an island of prosperity is receding as policymakers increasingly decide they must adopt rather than fight economic mediocrity.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Ignore the Rhetoric and Give Government a Time Out

    The juvenile rhetoric that dominates so much of politics today makes it hard to sort out the looming budget veto and the issues beneath it. The first step to understanding is to ignore everything every politician says.

  • Charts | Josh

    Who Wants to Spend Where? A General Fund Comparison

    Who want to spends where? These charts compares the actual and adjusted spending for the current budget, to the Governor’s proposed budget, the House budget, the Senate budget, and the Committee of Conference budget.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Why Steve Forbes is the Antidote to Modern Political Superficiality

    As public policy, politics, and elections slowly degenerate into a circus aimed at playing a game, calling names, and merely attacking another person, let me offer you Steve Forbes as an example for today of what the political world ought to be about and too often isn’t.

  • Budget | Josh | Questions and Answers

    Off Budget: What Happens if New Hampshire Doesn’t Have a Budget by June 30?

    What happens if there is no state budget by June 30? With the Legislature and Governor at such odds on the matter, it is a distinct possibility. It would not be that unusual either.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Don’t Pay Attention To The Budget Debate, It Doesn’t Matter

    The state budget is a pitched battle fought tooth and nail where the warriors largely agree. Posturing and the art of a press statement are more important than information. In reality, verbally armed camps will give way to easy agreement over all but one or two differences. Vetoes, stalemates, and months of budget-less government are much less likely than annoying-but-meaningless press releases you can safely ignore.

  • Data Points | Josh

    Comparing New Hampshire’s Recoveries

    Despite a history of leading the region out of recessions, New Hampshire’s recent track record of job creation falls well short of that legacy. Only as of March 2015 has the state returned to prerecession levels of employment and jobs numbers. This paper compares the last three recoveries to the current one, detailing the state’s increasing difficulty in recovering from economic downturns.