Welcome to the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy

Featured Posts
You’re reading the wrong books. Actually, maybe you’re okay but your friends or your kids need some help. Have no fear, I break from policy today to offer you some Advent reading advice in the final eight days before Christmas.

You Need Some Christmas Book Advice

You’re reading the wrong books. Actually, maybe you’re okay but your friends or your kids need some help. Have no ...

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Meet the Medicaid Enhancement Tax (MET)

Meet the MET

New Hampshire adopted the Medicaid Enhancement Tax as a means to leverage federal matching funds without imposing any real tax ...

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Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

The survey found that 97 percent of parents of scholarship recipients are satisfied with their chosen private or home schools, ...

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Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Choosing to Learn: Scholarship Tax Credit Programs in the United States and their Implications for New Hampshire

Access to educational opportunities in New Hampshire is primarily determined by zip code and accident of birth. Though New Hampshire ...

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Recent Articles

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Minimum Wage Hike Will Hurt Entry Level Workers Most

    Proposals at the state and national level to increase the minimum wage will hurt the job market, decrease the number of jobs available, and hurt the people advocates are trying to help. Specifically, the higher wage will make it more expensive to hire entry level workers and reduce opportunities for lower skill workers trying to build job experience.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Are We Doomed to Be a Stagnant State?

    New Hampshire is complacent. As a state we seem to have accepted stagnation as a way of life and are just trying to figure out how to adapt to it. The vision of New Hampshire as an island of prosperity is receding as policymakers increasingly decide they must adopt rather than fight economic mediocrity.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    You Need Some Christmas Book Advice

    You’re reading the wrong books. Actually, maybe you’re okay but your friends or your kids need some help. Have no fear, I break from policy today to offer you some Advent reading advice in the final eight days before Christmas.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Let’s Try to Ignore the Political Soap Opera

    Charlie Arlinghaus December 11, 2014 As originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader We all need to start ignoring political soap operas and focus on the real work of government. Sadly, the media is likely to report frequently and breathlessly about who likes who and who’s mad at who while ignoring most of the substantive […]

  • Josh | Pensions

    A Look at the New Hampshire Supreme Court’s Pension Reform Ruling

    Yesterday the New Hampshire Supreme Court handed down a ruling in the case of Professional Firefighters of New Hampshire, et al v State of New Hampshire; representing the culmination of nearly three and a half years of legal proceedings that sought to answer the question: how far can the state go in reforming pensions? The answer: pretty far.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Stagnation Needn’t Be Our Destiny

    One of the problems for all of us is that we are living in the past. We think reality is the same as it was 15 years ago but in actuality we’ve been left behind and are in danger of becoming a museum piece. New Hampshire has been left behind and most politicians are reduced to talking about a previous reality that no longer exists except in their mind.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Budget Gimmicks That Will Raid Your Wallet

    Tis the season for budget games. The groundwork is already being laid for tax increases and budget gimmicks all in the name of a balanced and equitable approach to government. We can only hope that the newly elected are less susceptible to these siren calls than the lot that came before them.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Divided Government Keeps Bad Things From Happening

    For the next two years small changes are possible but nothing big can happen because politics and money conspire against change. It’s not true that nothing important will happen but it is true that most major initiatives will flounder on the shoals of budget pressure and political competition.