Welcome to the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy

Featured Posts
The Budget Squabble Can't End Before October

The Budget Squabble Can't End Before October

The ongoing state budget fight is about yesterday not tomorrow. Big government squabbles are never about what the press release ...

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Off Budget:
What Happens if New Hampshire Doesn’t Have a Budget by June 30?

Off Budget: What Happens if New Hampshire Doesn’t Have a Budget by June 30?

What happens if there is no state budget by June 30? With the Legislature and Governor at such odds on ...

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Does Commuter Rail Create Jobs?

Does Commuter Rail Create Jobs?

While studies of proposed passenger commuter rail lines often predict job creation, studies of lines that have been built and ...

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Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

Live Free and Learn: A Case Study of NH's Scholarship Tax Credit Program

The survey found that 97 percent of parents of scholarship recipients are satisfied with their chosen private or home schools, ...

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Recent Articles

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Minimum Wage Hike Will Hurt Entry Level Workers Most

    Proposals at the state and national level to increase the minimum wage will hurt the job market, decrease the number of jobs available, and hurt the people advocates are trying to help. Specifically, the higher wage will make it more expensive to hire entry level workers and reduce opportunities for lower skill workers trying to build job experience.

  • Charlie | Weekly Column

    Are We Doomed to Be a Stagnant State?

    New Hampshire is complacent. As a state we seem to have accepted stagnation as a way of life and are just trying to figure out how to adapt to it. The vision of New Hampshire as an island of prosperity is receding as policymakers increasingly decide they must adopt rather than fight economic mediocrity.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    The Budget Squabble Can’t End Before October

    The ongoing state budget fight is about yesterday not tomorrow. Big government squabbles are never about what the press release claims. This one won’t and can’t be resolved quickly. The press conference phase of the budget that we are currently undergoing amounts to positioning before negotiations which can’t begin until official documents are released at the beginning of the Fall.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Bad Budget Information Creates Squabbles

    One of the greatest obstacles to our current crop of politicians getting along with each other is a lack of information or at least a lack of good information. Sharing information and sharing it correctly is important not just for the sake of government transparency but so political squabbles are more constructive.

  • Charlie | Taxes | Weekly Column

    Taxes aren’t what you think they are

    Charlie Arlinghaus July 15, 2015 As originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader Today is the Ides of July — or Quintilis if you aren’t fond of Julius Caesar –and a good time to remind us all what we do and don’t know about taxes — that perennial political football. Tax myths abound and all […]

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Fanciful Fiction of Fiscal Fracture

    Fissures over fiscal policy are fed by fanciful fictions that threaten the focus needed to fix the state’s financial budget. Political statements mislead you and indefensible charges are designed to distract you from a simple but philosophical disagreement.

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Budget Debates of Today Are Much Friendlier Than They Used to Be

    Charlie Arlinghaus July 1, 2015 As originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader Today’s politics are a model of civility and decorum compared to the budget debates of the recent past. The remarkably mild name calling associated with the current governor’s veto of the budget pales in comparison to the rancor and high drama of […]

  • Budget | Charlie | Weekly Column

    Ignore the Rhetoric and Give Government a Time Out

    The juvenile rhetoric that dominates so much of politics today makes it hard to sort out the looming budget veto and the issues beneath it. The first step to understanding is to ignore everything every politician says.