Archive for the Health Category

March 23, 2016 Countering the Powerful Work Disincentive in Medicaid Expansion Charles M. Arlinghaus   The New Hampshire state senate is prepared to ignore economic research and abandon any real effort to include a work requirement in its expansion of Medicaid to able-bodied, childless adults. A proposal that began as a supposed compromise would currently […]

 

Not all healthcare is created equal

Canada has one of the most commonly cited single-payer health systems in the world. Many countries are constantly trying to improve their healthcare system, leading to comparisons to perceptually better systems. But before anyone tries to make direct comparisons, they should remember that regardless of its design, no healthcare system was created in one step. Canada’s healthcare system has developed over decades, with the goal of providing equal care to every citizen.

 

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, a total of 11,446 New Hampshire residents have selected a health insurance plan through the Federal Exchange. This represents a net increase of 9,877 in the month of December.

 

A few yars ago, Oregon chose to expand Medicaid coverage to the population now under consideration for coverage here in New Hampshire. In Oregon’s case, state funds would cover the total cost of the program. The problem for Oregon policy makers was that there was only enough money available to cover some, not all, of those eligible. To remain fair, coverage in the expanded Medicaid program was chosen by lottery.

 

The latest data released by the Department of Health and Human Services showed that a total of 1,300 New Hampshire residents have selected a health insurance plan through the federal exchange during the month of November. Since open enrollment began on October 1, a total of 1,529 have signed up.

 

On Medicaid expansion, there is no relevant difference between the Republican and Democratic proposals being considered by the special session. An important flaw in the Senate Republican plan makes it roughly the same as the proposal pushed by the governor and the House Democrats.

 

In a special legislative session scheduled to begin November 7, the state will consider not just expanding the Medicaid program in New Hampshire but also a dramatic change in what sort of program Medicaid is. The dramatic nature of those changes and very uncertain finances make finding the common ground needed a difficult task at best.

 

There’s a very easy way to tell if you’ve been the victim of one of the many scam websites that popped up this month to take advantage of people trying to sign up for Obamacare. It worked. If you’ve tried to buy insurance through HealthCare.gov, you almost certainly couldn’t log on, couldn’t enter your personal information or couldn’t get accurate pricing for your limited insurance options.

 

On Medicaid, A Tale of Two Commissions

The Medicaid commission that ended this week was a well meaning distraction that won’t produce a compromise but may lead to some constructive conversations. Policymakers, notably the governor and the senate president, can use the commission as an example in both good ways and bad. In that respect, perhaps the commission was a useful first step toward a productive discussion.