Archive for the Policy in Brief Category

Don’t Make the Rest of Us Pay for Your Solar Subsidies Charles M. Arlinghaus   Solar advocates are fighting to protect and increase the subsidized, above-market electric rates they get through a program called net metering. The debate isn’t about whether to allow solar energy but over how much of a subsidy to give solar […]

 

March 9 , 2016 Broadband Boondoggle is Risky Proposition Charles M. Arlinghaus   Changing state law to allow towns to borrow money to run their own internet companies is not about bringing service to the remarkably small number of consumers without access to broadband. It is a mistake that would expose property taxpayers to the […]

 

Despite a recent shift toward national control over education policy, New Hampshire has implemented a variety of measures designed to embrace localization and flexibility. Some of the policies that have arisen include a new learning model, raised teacher quality, promotion of charter schools, and a raised dropout age

 

Joshua Elliott-Traficante August 2012 The first Friday of every month, the Department of Labor releases its monthly jobs report. The figure usually reported in the media as the ‘unemployment rate’ is actually just one of six different classifications of unemployment that the Department uses. These are numbered U-1 through U-6 and as the numbers go […]

 

Charles M. Arlinghaus  March 2012 Summary: New Hampshire should join the Health Care Compact to allow different states to try different health care reforms. The results of those reform pilot programs may give New Hampshire the opportunity to replicate better or more efficient programs here if we choose. The compact has no cost associated with […]

 

Healthcare Exchanges

This is our dedicated page to information on healthcare exchanges, which are a centerpiece to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as ‘Obamacare’ It will be periodically updated. JBC President Charlie Arlinghaus on Healthcare Exchanges and why they are bad for NH Cato’s Director of Healthcare Studies Michael Cannon and John […]

 

Charles M. Arlinghaus  October 6, 2010 Originally published in the New Hampshire Union Leader After months of discussion about the exact size of the historic deficit we face next year, the news is filled suddenly with reports of a surplus. Did something change or are we just in the middle of election season? The short […]

 

Borrowing, transfers, and wishful thinking draw the actual spending cuts and tax increases included in a $295 million budget deal unveiled Tuesday, June 8 at the State House.

House and Senate budget writers have crafted a package that includes nearly $72 million in spending cuts, which doesn’t include an $18.5 million increase in HHS spending. It also contains $4.99 million in tax increases, $51.21 in lapses and transfer among state agencies, $65 million in borrowing, and $112.87 million in speculative revenues that may never be realized.

 

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